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Wally Walrus:
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The Beach Nut (1944, October 16)
Ski For Two (1944, November 13)
The Sliphorn King of Polaroo (1945, March 19)
The Dippy Diplomat (1945, August 27)
The Reckless Driver (1946, August 26)
Well Oiled (1947, June 30)
Kiddie Koncert (1948, April 23)
Wacky-Bye Baby (1948, May 1)
Dog Tax Dodgers (1948, November 26)
Slingshot 6 7/8 (1951, July 23)
Sleep Happy (1951, March 26)
The Woody Woodpecker Polka (1951, October 29)
What's Sweepin' (1953, January 5)



The Beach Nut (1944, October 16)

Wally Walrus

About The Beach Nut (1944):  Wally's first appearance!

Ski For Two (1944, November 13)

Ski For Two Wally Walrus

Wally Walrus

About Ski For Two (1944):  One of Wally's all-time best!

The Sliphorn King of Polaroo (1945, March 19)

Wally Walrus

About The Sliphorn King of Polaroo (1945):  This was the last of the "Swing Symphony" series of cartoons.  Wally Walrus was originally set to be the star of the cartoon, the sliphorn trombone player named Jackson.  Even early storyboards showed Wally as the lead character.  However, Jackson was changed to a lion, and Wally was dropped save for a short sight gag.  Why the change to a lion?  It's not exactly known, but probably because it was funnier to see a lion at the South Pole; a walrus would have been more at home in the cold climate.  Also, Wally is a fat character, and the skinny lion was much easier to make flexible for all the funny physical comedy.  The cartoon's music was by legendary jazz great Jack Teagarden.

The Dippy Diplomat (1945, August 27)

Wally Walrus

About The Dippy Diplomat (1945):

The Reckless Driver (1946, August 26)

Wally Walrus

About The Reckless Driver (1946):

Well Oiled (1947, June 30)

Wally Walrus

About Well Oiled (1947):

Kiddie Koncert (1948, April 23)

Wally Walrus

About Kiddie Koncert (1948):  In this cartoon, Wally Walrus is the major star!  He's the conductor of the orchestra.

Wacky-Bye Baby (1948, May 1)

Wally Walrus

About Wacky-Bye Baby (1948):  If it wasn't so funny, I'd almost feel sorry for Wally in this one.  He really takes a beating!  "Oh, yunior!"

Dog Tax Dodgers (1948, November 26)

Wally Walrus

About Dog Tax Dodgers (1948):  Wally Walrus played the antagonist in this Andy Panda cartoon.  It was rare for Wally to appear outside of Woody Woodpecker cartoons.  Even more rare to star in his own.  In later years, Wally Walrus appeared in some Chilly Willy cartoons.

Slingshot 6 7/8 (1951, July 23)

Wally Walrus

About Slingshot 6 7/8 (1951):  Wally Walrus had a very small part in this cartoon.  Buzz Buzzard was Woody's antagonist.

Sleep Happy (1951, March 26)

Wally Walrus Wally Walrus

About Sleep Happy (1951):  The strength of this cartoon is Wally's facial expressions.  I don't think I've ever seen his face have so much expression as I have in this cartoon.  Other than that, this isn't one of my favorite Wally Walrus cartoons.  For one thing, he doesn't talk at all, and a big part of his appeal in his voice.  Plus, the comedy is monotonous; Woody's keeping Wally from sleeping, and Wally's best efforts can't help him get a good night's sleep.  There were a ton of cartoons from all the major studios back then with the same theme, and I don't care for any of them too much.

The Woody Woodpecker Polka (1951, October 29)

Wally Walrus

About The Woody Woodpecker Polka (1951):  Again, Wally doesn't talk, but he's given some of his best physical comedy.  Plus, it's funny to see him as a country bumpkin.

What's Sweepin' (1953, January 5)

Wally Walrus

About What's Sweepin' (1953):  Wally is an Irish cop.  I love the cop idea, but not the Irish.  Nothing can beat Wally's standard Swedish accent!  Still, a great cartoon!